Trump’s Pick For Deputy Budget Director: Islam Is ‘A Deficient Theology’

WASHINGTON ? President Donald Trump?s nominee for deputy director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, Russell Vought, thinks that Islam is ?a deficient theology? and that Muslims ?stand condemned? for not believing in Jesus Christ.

At least, that?s what Vought wrote in a January 2016 post on the conservative blog, The Resurgent.

In his piece, titled ?Wheaton College and the Preservation of Theological Clarity,? Vought makes the case that someone can?t really ?know God? without a focus on Jesus.

?Muslims do not simply have a deficient theology,? he writes. ?They do not know God because they have rejected Jesus Christ his Son, and they stand condemned.?

A White House spokeswoman did not respond to a request for comment on whether Trump stands by Vought?s comments.

Vought, who spent seven years as vice president of the conservative Heritage Action for America, is set for his Senate nomination hearing on Wednesday. He must be confirmed by the Senate to get the job.

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April 18, 2018

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Over the ages, it has always been the duty of a society to take care of its elderly. This is especially true when the senior citizens in question are our parents eld.Parents often make huge sacrifices as they bring up their children so as to ensure the children get better lives and also in the hope that in their old age, their children Centrifugally cast tubes from aluminum and bronze are easy to come by especially here in Los Angeleswill be there for them. The vulnerability occasioned by old age makes special care a necessity and not a privilege.

April 7, 2018

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These Two Univ. of Minnesota Teammates Open Up About Falling In Love

This article originally appeared on Outsports

You can read Justin Rabon?s full coming-out story here.

You can read Brad Neumann?s full coming-out story here.

Brad Neumann and Justin Rabon are teammates in love.

The two Univ. of Minnesota Golden Gophers were both struggling on their college track teams just a couple years ago when they found the courage to come out to one another via text message.

That was late in 2014 ? They have been together almost since that day.

While they have been out for much of the last two years, it was only recently that we tracked them down on Instagram, where they do not shy away from sharing photographs of one another and the love they share.

Theirs is a relationship the likes of which we are hearing about more and more, between two gay teammates. Though, they weren?t exactly teammates when they first started dating, but for that story you?ll have to read the wonderful coming-out pieces these two great guys wrote for us.

You can read Justin Rabon?s full coming-out story here.

You can read Brad Neumann?s full coming-out story here.

For more from OutSports, check out these stories:

Tennis legend Margaret Court compares gays to Hitler

US Soccer will don gay apparel for Pride Month

Miami tennis player wants to end bisexual confusion

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February 20, 2018

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The New York Times Is Eliminating The Public Editor Role

The New York Times is eliminating the position of public editor, an accountability role the paper created in 2003 in the wake of the Jayson Blair plagiarism scandal, according to sources familiar with the decision. 

Elizabeth Spayd, a former Washington Post managing editor who was named the paper?s sixth public editor last year, was expected to remain in the position until summer 2018. 

Spayd did not respond to requests for comment. A Times spokesperson declined to comment. 

The decision comes a day after the Times announced the creation of a ?Reader Center? led by editor Hanna Ingber. One role of the new ?Reader Center? is to improve how the Times ?respond(s) directly to tips feedback, questions, concerns, complaints and other queries from the public,? according to a Tuesday memo. 

Several news organizations, including The Washington Post, have phased out the position of ombudsman or public editor in recent years. Post editor Marty Baron justified ending the role by pointing out that the paper receives plenty of criticism from ?all quarters, instantly, in this Internet age.?

It?s true that major news organizations face scrutiny from traditional media critics and reporters covering the press, along with partisan outlets across the spectrum and members of the public on social media. But by being in the newsroom, public editors and ombudsmen can often get responses from management that outside reporters and critics can not. 

This is a breaking news item. Please check back for updates. 

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February 3, 2018

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An Endangered Lizard From Indonesia May Hold The Key To Treating Superbugs

Komodo dragons, the 10-foot, 300-pound lizards found in Indonesia, do not bite humans unless attacked, but when they do, it can prove deadly. Not only is the venom in their teeth potentially fatal, they may also harbor bacteria in their mouths that is dangerous to their prey (typically, deer and pigs).

The question of whether Komodo dragons deliver fatal bacterial infections to their prey when they bite has been somewhat controversial: A 2013 study, refuting previously accepted common wisdom, swabbed the mouths of 16 captive Komodo dragons and found they had less bacteria than other predators, such as lions. 

Nonetheless, Komodo dragons in the wild eat carrion and live in environments rich in bacteria yet rarely become infected, though local prey such as water buffalo do. And one reason may be because of a special resistance to dangerous bacteria in the form of cationic antimicrobial peptides, a type of protein that fights off harmful bacteria and that researchers have found in the animals? blood.

?Komodo dragons are known to harbor high levels of bacteria in their mouths. They don?t suffer from negative effects of bacteria in their own mouths,? said Barney Bishop, one of the study?s authors and an associate professor at George Mason University?s chemistry and biochemistry department. 

Using the peptide in the dragon?s blood as inspiration, the researchers designed a synthetic chemical called DRGN-1, which imitates Komodo dragon blood.

As superbugs become more resistant to antibiotics, scientists are turning toward bioprospecting ? or looking to nature for potential medicines. In a recent study published in Biofilms and Microbiomes, researchers from George Mason University found an answer in Komodo dragons, which are native to Indonesian islands.

?We thought the best place to look was animals that are known to thrive under adverse conditions,? Bishop said. 

Since the 1940s, antibiotics have reduced deaths from infectious diseases, but they?ve become so widespread that the bacteria the antibiotics are supposed to kill have adapted. Now, every year, at least 2 million people become infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and at least 23,000 people die from their infection.

The military?s Defense Threat Reduction Agency funded this research, hoping the team could look to ?extreme animals? to find new ways to defend against infections. This could possibly lead to new drugs to fight superbugs and protect people from bacterial bioweapons.

?We?re in an age of emerging antibiotic resistance,? said Monique van Hoek, one of the study?s authors and an associate professor at George Mason University?s National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases. ?We think it?s very important to take these new approaches to discover new ways to kill bacteria. By going into nature, we?re finding a new starting point for this.?

The team found that when DRGN-1 was used to treat infected wounds, these wounds healed significantly faster than untreated wounds or wounds treated with other peptides. That?s in part because DRGN-1 breaks down biofilms, a film of bacteria that sticks to a wound?s surface, which is not addressed by conventional antibiotics.

?It both clears the bacteria out of the wounds and it helps the wounds to heal,? van Hoek said.

The Komodo dragon is currently a vulnerable species with about 6,000 animals remaining, but the researchers collected less than four tablespoons of blood for testing from Tujah, a captive Komodo dragon that lives in the St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park in Florida. Tujah was not harmed in this process.

?This allows us to test endangered animals or very small animals because we don?t need a very large sample,? van Hoek said.

Bishop and van Hoek, who have been collaborating on antimicrobial discovery research since 2009, have also studied American alligators, Chinese alligators, Siamese crocodiles and saltwater crocodiles for possible treatment.

Right now, the DRGN-1 research is still in the preclinical phase, and the team is at the early stages of trying to commercialize the peptide. But down the road, DRGN-1 may help fight the superbugs of the future.

?When we started this project, it was a high-risk project. The DTRA took a gamble on us,? Bishop said. ?The fact that we saw a complexity of peptides from the animals we?re testing on, there?s still a lot to learn. It?s very enriching.?

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January 24, 2018

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